Lines And Ladders Performance Diary 20: Place Matters

I was born in Carlisle, but growing up in north Cumbria, I didn’t feel particularly local. Neither of my parents had grown up in the area and although my paternal grandparents lived nearby, I don’t think that I really appreciated what that meant. I knew the house where my grandfather was born – his cousins still lived there – and it was just 5 miles away from where I lived as a teenager. But as a kid and a teenager, even one fascinated by history, I wasn’t really interested. History was further away and further back. Perhaps the thought of my Grandfather as a baby was too impossible to comprehend and so I didn’t connect.

When I did become interested, it didn’t take long to dig up roots buried deep in the Cumbrian soil. Knights Lodge, Ivegill, where my Grandfather was born, had been bought by his grandparents in 1903. As a teenager I had been living within a five miles of where my 2x great grandparents lived and farmed 100 years back.

To get to Ivegill, Isabella and William Nichol had moved from north west of Carlisle to the south. Although, as every local will tell you, Carlisle is the largest city in the country, this really isn’t very far. Their lines can be traced further back into the villages of Cargo, Rockcliffe and Bewcastle.

It mattered to me to bring the game to Carlisle. To take my research home.

I was very lucky that the owners of Cakes & Ale were happy to host me for the week. Cakes & Ale is a relatively new café in Carlisle, but it is part of a local chain of bookshops that has been in the county for many years. As a child, I spent hours selecting second hand copies of Nancy Drew paperbacks in Bookcase and just over 20 years ago I started a Saturday job in Bookends. Back then Bookends was in a different building. It had a small front on to the street, but a flight of stairs led to a maze of rooms underground.  On first discovering this people would often re-emerge in wonder at the treasures they found buried in those caverns.

Now Bookends, Bookcase and Cakes & Ale are all in one rambling building. A building bursting with books, corners crammed with delicious volumes and a welcoming café with mismatched crockery where reading is encouraged.

Bringing the game back to Carlisle was important, but even more than in other cities, the venue here mattered. Taking the game to Cakes & Ale was re-visiting part of my own personal history.

This didn’t mean that the games were always easy and, in the end, there weren’t many conversations about Carlisle, but it was an important thing to do and a perfect place for Lines And Ladders.

Clockwise from top left: Rockcliffe Church; Gravestone of Joseph and Sarah Lowry and their grandson Joseph Edward Lowry at Rockcliffe Church, Joseph and Sarah are my 3 x great grandparents; Lines And Ladders in Cakes & Ale; Carlisle Castle; Hot chocolate and traybake in Cakes & Ale; West Walls in Carlisle; Cakes & Ale.

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